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Feb 022011
 

It’s no secret—we at The Animal Science Monitor believe in the benefits of attending industry events like conferences and conventions.  Not only are their tremendous training opportunities available at these events, but there are also chances for you to network with other professionals in your chosen field.  That’s why we promote upcoming events in animal science and animal nutrition and why we’ll continue to do so.  With that being said, we’re pleased to promote these upcoming industry events:

Great Lakes Regional Dairy Conference—The Great Lakes Regional Dairy Conference is dedicated to helping dairy producers learn new ways of increasing their profitability by doing more with less. Leading experts will make presentations on topics ranging from dairy nutrition and reproduction to labor management and environmental stewardship.  In addition to the quality line up of educational speakers, spouses will not want to miss the popular Partners Program, which promises a variety of entertaining and educational sessions. The location of this year’s event is the Bavarian Inn Lodge and Conference Center in Frankenmuth, Minn., and the dates are Thursday, February 10, through Sunday, February 12 Click here for more information.

35th Annual National Wild Turkey Federation Convention and Sport Show—This event is an annual conference that draws up to 50,000 people At this event, there will be more than 600 booths loaded with hunting gear from all your favorite brands; the biggest stars from outdoor television, including Michael Waddell and Brenda Valentine, the NWTF’s national spokespersons!; The best turkey callers in the world competing in the Grand National Turkey Calling Championships; and Music from legendary entertainer Trace Adkins, The Band Perry and more!  The location of this year’s event is the Gaylord Opryland Resort and Convention Center in Nashville, Tenn., and the dates are Wednesday, February 16, through Sunday, February 20Click here for more information.

If there’s an industry event that you believe we should promote through our newsletter, please email your information to matt@animalsciencemonitor.com.

Jan 162011
 

The ‘Career Book of the Month’ is . . . 

Welcome to a new feature in The Animal Science Monitor!  In today’s challenging economic environment, you need every edge that you can get.  That’s why in one issue per month throughout 2011, we’ll take a look at a book designed to help you advance your career. 

This month’s book in the “Career Book” spotlight is Words That Work: It’s Not What You Say, It’s What People Hear by Frank Luntz (2008, 368 pages). 

Synopsis: The nation s premier communications expert shares his wisdom on how the words we choose can change the course of business, of politics, and of life in this country. 

Dan Simmons’s review: “This book is concisely written, easy to read, and shares practical tips for effective communication for anyone who wants to have people buy into their vision.” 

Click here to read other reviews of Words at Work at BarnesandNoble.com.  (And remember, we don’t receive a commission if you purchase the book through this site.  We’re recommending books such as this only because we believe they will enhance your career.) 

If you have a career book that you’ve read and you’d like to endorse, we’d be happy to publish your endorsement.  Send your information to matt@animalsciencemonitor.com, and you might be included in a future issue of the newsletter!

Jan 162011
 

Welcome to the first installment of our “In Search of . . .” series in 2011!  For those of you who aren’t familiar with it, we’ll highlight Dan Simmons’s hottest job opening in the first issue of each month.  The same job might run in consecutive issues, but our goal is to give exposure to as many openings as possible throughout the year.  Below is the position that we’d like to highlight in this issue of The Animal Science Monitor

R&D MANAGER 

Location: Minneapolis, MN

Contact Dan Simmons: (888) 276-6789 or dan@consearch.com 

Experienced food industry leader to manage new product development projects in a growing customer-focused company committed to the pursuit of perfection.  This is a large, privately held, expanding, and integrated agri-business leader seeking an R&D Manager to provide technical and managerial guidance to enhance the company’s sale of their ingredients. 

To be considered for this role: 

  • You must have 10+ years of R&D experience with a major food or food ingredient company and a Master’s Degree in Food Science or a related discipline.
  • You must have experience with emulsifiers or emulsion in food systems and ingredients.
  • Specifically, you must have product process for production of Mayo and Dressing Products.
  • You must have a strong Research & Development background in the Food Science industry, along with knowledge of raw material and ingredient functionality, as well as knowledge of or experience with Gum and Starch systems.
  • Procedural competence—The ability to maintain compliance with HACCP and USDA guidelines, along with the ability to work cross-functionally with the various departments, including Quality, Sales, and the customer.  Technical expertise with sensory systems necessary, as well as product development, product trials, and converting from test to a full production environment.
  • Innovative—The ability to engage effectively with all stakeholders and develop new products that include the company’s ingredients, along with the benefits of utilization or development of alternative product ingredients to meet customer functional needs.
  • Excellent people skills—Along with excellent written and oral communication skills at all levels in the organization, you will also provide leadership, motivate others, and be an accomplished problem solver with a high level of personal initiative.  You will be self driven, action-results oriented, and have the ability to prioritize and follow through.  You will also be computer literate with Word, Excel, and Outlook.

Preferences are that this person will possess a Chemical Engineering undergraduate degree and ideally be bilingual (English and Spanish). 

Five (5) reasons why this is a great job for the right person: 

  1. This is a growing company with a passion for the pursuit of perfection.
  2. The organization is extremely efficient and cutting-edge with a global perspective.
  3. The company is committed to providing the capital resources necessary to achieve its goals.
  4. The company has a “family feel’ environment.
  5. The position has a competitive salary with relocation assistance.

If you’d like more information about how you can give your open positions exposure in The ASM or if you’d like more information about the position listed above, contact Dan Simmons at (888) 276-6789 or via email at dan@consearch.com.

Nov 142010
 

Two Tenure-Track Faculty Positions – Department of Animal Science

University of Vermont

The Department of Animal Science at the University of Vermont invites applications for two Tenure-track Faculty Positions to begin August 2011.
Food Animal Biotechnology: This is a 9 month, tenure track, research and teaching position. Responsibilities include teaching and advising undergraduate and graduate level courses, and University service. In addition, the appointee will be required to develop a funded, innovative research program in the area of animal/rumen biotechnology to address areas of economic importance and interest to Animal Agriculture and/or Food Systems. Ideally, the research program should focus towards product differentiation and value added treatment-based strategies tailored towards different market segments, such as: infants (development and growth, disease control, or prevention of adult disease), youths (development and growth, or prevention of adult disease), adults (maintenance of good health), and the elderly (delay senility – “Cognitive Foods”, reduce osteoporosis – “milk products”). Work can also be tailored towards value added processing of biomaterials and by-products. Research focused on dairy cattle is preferred and the appointee will be expected to collaborate with colleagues within and outside the Department of Animal Science to strengthen national and Vermont dairy issues.

For further information on the Food Animal Biotechnology position, contact search committee chair Dr. Feng-Qi Zhao at feng-qi.zhao@uvm.edu.

Animal Genetics/Genomics: This is a 9 month, tenure track, research and teaching position. Responsibilities include teaching an introductory animal genetics course (focusing on ruminant and monogastric livestock animals), contributing to upper or graduate level courses, and advising undergraduate and graduate students. University service is also expected. In addition, the appointee will be required to develop a funded, innovative research program that will focus on host animal genetics and biochemical processes influencing desirable production traits in livestock and/or environmentally sustainable food production systems. This integral process will ultimately lead to the development of healthier and more nutritious foods, while establishing breeding lines of highly productive, but low methane emitting dairy and beef cattle. Moreover, this individual will be part of a large multidisciplinary team that will contribute new knowledge to better understand and combat obesity in humans where there is a direct link between intestinal microbial ecology and the diversion of calories towards fat production. Research focused on dairy cattle is preferred and the appointee will be expected to collaborate with colleagues within and outside the Department of Animal Science to strengthen national and Vermont dairy issues. Research programs should incorporate the use of Genetics, Genomics, Proteomics, and, or Metabolomics.

For further information on the Animal Genetics/Genomic position,  contact search committee chair Dr. David Kerr at david.kerr@uvm.edu.

Applicants for either position are encouraged to apply before December 6, 2010, at which time review of applications will begin.  Candidates must have a Ph.D. or equivalent doctoral level degree in Dairy Science, Animal Science, Animal Genetics, Molecular Genetics, Functional Genomics, Biotechnology, or a closely related field. At least two years postdoctoral experience is required and demonstration of success in attracting extramural funds is preferred.

All candidates must apply online at www.uvmjobs.com and must attach to that application a curriculum vitae and statements of research interests and teaching philosophy along with three (3) letters of recommendation.

The University of Vermont is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action employer. Applications from women and people from diverse racial, ethnic, and cultural backgrounds are encouraged.  The University is especially interested in candidates who can contribute to the diversity and excellence of the academic community through their research, teaching, and/or service. Applicants are requested to include in their cover letter information about how they will further this goal. For more information regarding the University of Vermont’s diversity initiatives, please visit the President’s web site at: http://www.uvm.edu/president.

Founded in 1791, UVM has been called one of the “public ivies” and is consistently ranked as one of the top public universities in the United States. The University is located in Burlington, Vermont, also rated as one of the best small cities in America. The greater Burlington area has a population of about 125,000 and enjoys a panoramic setting on the shores of Lake Champlain, between the Green Mountains of Vermont and the Adirondack Mountains of New York. Burlington and the surrounding area provide an environment rich in cultural and recreational activities for individuals and families, with multiple opportunities for interactions with local industry and communities.

The University of Vermont recently identified three “Spires of Excellence” in which it will strategically focus institutional investments and growth over the next several years. These include: Neuroscience, Behavior and Health; Complex Systems; and Food Systems. Candidates whose research, scholarship, and/or creative work interests align or intersect with these three areas, particularly Food Systems (http://www.uvm.edu/~tri/?Page=foodsys.php), are especially encouraged to apply.

The Department of Animal Science has nearly 300 undergraduate students in four concentrations of study: pre-veterinary, equine, dairy, and general animal science. The Department currently has 12 graduate students and offers an integrated Animal, Nutrition & Food Science Ph.D. program. There is also strong opportunity to collaborate with the W.H. Miner Agricultural Institute in nearby Chazy, NY. More information on the Department is available at: http://asci.uvm.edu/.

Oct 062010
 

At the 2010 National Conference for Agribusiness, you will:

  • Discover new ways to grow sales
  • Pickup tips on recruiting Millennials to your company and managing them after making the hire
  • Think about sustainability as an opportunity for growth and innovation, rather than a mere requirement
  • Meet, network, and share ideas with a group of your peers

Plus, so much more. Find out what else the conference offers or register online today by visiting the conference Web site.

Sep 082010
 
The Animal Science Monitor
In This Issue

About This Issue


Before the Interview:
Questions to Ask


The ‘WOW! Factor’


‘Opportunity Spotlight’:
Berry College


 Connecting You


 Coming Up in the Next Issue 


Lookingfor a new career in the Animal ScienceIndustry?Please visit:
www.animalsciencejobs.comConnect with TheASM!

LinkedIn
Twitter
Facebook

Visit us on the web! www.animalsciencemonitor.com

About This Issue…Success in the workplace – and in life – is all about opportunities, and this issue of The Animal Science Monitor is centered almost exclusively on opportunities. For example, we further discuss opportunities involved in the interview process for candidates, as well as the opportunity that companies have to “Wow!” the right candidate and ensure that they don’t get away. In addition, we have not one, but TWO employment opportunities for those of you who are looking for a new challenge. So I’d like to take this opportunity (of course) to thank you for being a loyal reader of The ASM, and I hope that you enjoy this current issue.

 – Dan
 
 

 

Before the Interview: Questions to Ask

(By Dan Simmons) 
Now we’re on to the meat of the interview . . . the question-asking phase. However, it’s important to remember that you’re just not answering questions. You should be asking them, as well. 
The interviewer’s perception of how sharp you are is heavily influenced by the questions you ask, and your questions – including the words you select to express them – will definitely affect the interviewer’s assessment of you.  Preparing a list of questions will make you much more organized and efficient. The interviewers will notice. A list also ensures that you won’t overlook needed information. Therefore, preparing a list of questions is strongly advised. 

Your list of questions should be carried in your portfolio or folder.  Make a list of all the data you need to gather. From that list, you need to develop 10 to 15 strong questions. These questions should include: “Why do you feel this position would be attractive to someone with my background and skills?,” “What things make it attractive to be an employee of your company,?,” and “What qualities do you appreciate most in a member of your staff?” (often followed by “What do you appreciate the least?”). 

Having 10 to 15 questions is very important because most of the data you want will be given to you in various ways throughout the interview. At one or several points during the interview, the interviewers will ask if you have any other questions. At this point, a very shrewd thing to do is to pull out your list, scan it, and ask a couple of questions. This will make it crystal-clear that you took the interview seriously and were prepared.

With that in mind, below are some additional questions you might want to ask:

  • What are the most important responsibilities of the job?
  • To whom will I report and what is his or her background?
  • Will I mainly inherit projects or initiate them?
  • Is this a team environment or individual contributor role?
  • What is the most important thing I can do to help your firm in the first 90 days of my employment?
  • Why did my predecessor leave—or is this a new position?
  • What criteria are used to evaluate my performance?
  • Is there a formal evaluation process?
  • Will I have subordinates?  If so, what are their strengths and weaknesses?
  • What aspects of my background make me right or wrong for this position?
  • What will my work setting be like—private office, common area, etc.?
  • How much will I be expected to travel?
  • With whom would I interact most—peers, customers, vendors, etc.?
  • What support or training will be available to me to help me learn what I need to know to be successful?

Remember, very seldom is it possible to get all the information you want during the interview. However, once you receive an offer, you can easily get any reasonable information that you request.

If you have any questions about this article, feel free to contact me at dan@consearch.com.
Connect with Dan on LinkedIn.
 

 

The ‘WOW! Factor’

(By Dan Simmons) 
Recruiting a top-notch candidate is a lot like dating. You want to find out all about him/her and you also want to present yourself in the best light possible. You get excited when you first meet such a candidate, just like after a great first date. The interview process is a lot like romance, too.  If all is going well, you want it to go smoothly and at just the right moment you want to ask for a commitment, hoping for an enthusiastic “Yes!” 
I once heard a stand-up comic talk about how men often propose.  They get dinner reservations at a fancy restaurant, get a bottle of wine (or two), and hope that in the dim light of a romantic setting and after the glow of the wine has kicked in that he will have the courage to make the big offer.  By presenting her with a shining rock, he also hopes that she will be so caught up in the moment (and possibly the wine) that she will immediately and wholeheartedly commit to a lifetime together. 

There are many similarities between this scenario and the job offer.  In today’s market, once you get to the point in the interview process where decisions are made, you need to act swiftly and boldly

Going back to the restaurant analogy, does the man who proposed want to hear, “Well, that’s a very solid offer, but I’d like a couple of weeks to think about it, as I’m dating other guys,” or does he want her to say, “Wow! Of course, I’ll spend the rest of my life with you!”? 

The same is true in business.  You want to hear “Wow!” So how do you get the “Wow! Factor”?  Unlike the proposal, I don’t encourage two bottles of wine, but I do recommend making an offer that is so attractive that the person can’t say no.  When companies are determined to only hire great talent, great talent has choices, so you need to make an offer they can’t refuse. 

By the way, you might want to remember the shining rock, and by that I mean a signing bonus.  Just like the diamond engagement ring is meant to dazzle and seek a commitment, a good sign-on bonus can have the same impact. 

Here are some important things to remember about extending an attractive offer:

  • For a great candidate, go to the maximum salary possible.  Quibbling over ten thousand dollars for a great candidate is peanuts.  Do you want your competition to be able to hire this candidate?  Do you want the candidate to think about your offer or immediately say “YES!”?
  • A signing bonus has an immediate, positive effect on the newly hired, yet only costs once.
  • Move quickly once a decision has been made.  Just like in romance, there is a time to propose and a time when it’s just too late because the other person has moved on emotionally.
  • Be decisive.  If you want to hire, make the offer.  People respect the ability of others to make a decision and are cautious about those who can’t.  We’ve all heard about commitment-phobia.
  • Document your offer in writing so there are no misunderstandings later.
 
One last thing—when you “Wow!” a candidate, they are likely to accept.  If the candidate says, “That’s an attractive offer,” you didn’t “Wow!” them.
If you have any questions about this article, feel free to contact me at dan@consearch.com.
 
  
 

 

Connecting You: American Embryo Transfer Association

(By Matt Deutsch) 

Welcome to the next installment of “Connecting You,” a new series of articles within The Animal Science Monitor newsletter. “Connecting You” will showcase a number of associations within the world of animal science and animal nutrition. 

One such organization will be highlighted each month, usually in the second issue of that month (or sometimes in both issues, like this month).  Our goal is to promote the organization, its website, its mission within the industry, and its upcoming events. We believe that giving exposure to these organizations will prove to be beneficial not only for them, but also for you—our readers. 
 

This issue’s organization: 

American Embryo Transfer Association (http://www.aeta.org

Its mission: 

There are five parts to the AETA’s mission statement: 

  1. To unite those organizations and individuals in the United States engaged in the embryo transfer industry into an affiliated federation operating under self-imposed standards of performance and conduct
  2. To present a unified voice of the industry to promote the mutual interests and ideals of its members
  3. To protect the users of the embryo transfer industry to the extent technically and ethically possible
  4. To educate the public properly to the status and capability of the United States embryo transfer industry
  5. To encourage others to engage in the pursuit of this industry

 

Upcoming events: 

The AETA holds an annual meeting every year.  Below are the dates and locations for its next three events:

2010 AETA/CETA-ACTE Annual Meeting
Thursday, October 21, through Saturday, October 23
Concord, North Carolina

2011 Joint Annual Convention
Thursday, August 25, through Saturday, August 27
Marriott Riverwalk
San Antonio, Texas

2013 Joint Annual Convention
Thursday, October 10, through Saturday, October 12
Grand Sierra Resort & Casino
Reno, Nevada 

Membership information: 

Full-time students at colleges and universities can become members of the American Embryo Transfer Association at the cost of $25 per year. 

For more information about AETA membership, visit the organization’s website.  You can also reach the AETA via email at aeta@assochq.org
 

Read future issues of The Animal Science Monitor for more information regarding organizations within the animal science and animal nutrition industries. 
 

Membership link: 

http://www.aeta.org 

 
‘Opportunity Spotlight’: Berry College
From time to time, The Animal Science Monitor spotlights specific career opportunities within the areas of animal science and animal nutrition, and we’d like to do so again in this issue.  Berry College currently has a premium opportunity for the right person, and below is a full description of that opportunity.  If you’re interested in giving your opening exposure in The ASM, please send an email to dan@consearch.com
 

Job Description:
Berry College is currently recruiting for the position of Director of Agricultural Operations.  Reporting directly to the Vice President for Finance, the primary responsibilities of this new position will be to directly oversee and develop a strategic business plan for the college’s farm enterprises, including the following: 
 

  • Dairy operations—The college currently has an award-winning Jersey Dairy herd.
  • Beef operations—The college currently has an award-winning Black Angus Beef herd.
  • Equine operations—The college currently boards horses for students and supports the college varsity equestrian program.
  • Horticultural operations—The college currently operates several greenhouses and grows and harvests vegetables and plants.
 
The Director of Agricultural Operations must share Berry’s commitment to strong and engaging academic programs, especially the nationally known animal science program, the nation’s premier student work experience program, student moral and spiritual growth, and significant service to others. 
Responsibilities to meet these commitments include the following: 
 

 

 

  • Providing support for and maintaining a productive working relationship with faculty in the animal science program curriculum
  • Supervising and mentoring students in the student work experience program and fostering student-operated enterprises integrated with the activities of the animal science program
  • Developing new student enterprises, including opportunities in the areas of agri-education and sustainable agriculture
 
This position will have five staff reports, as well as a student work team to support his/her endeavors. 
Education and Experience:
The successful candidate must possess a minimum of a Bachelor’s degree.  A Master’s degree is greatly preferred.  The candidate must also have significant experience in the agricultural operations area; a keen understanding of how to develop and execute a viable business plan that may include dealing directly with wholesale/retail entities; strong and productive communication skills, both oral and written; and excellent relational skills with an ability to lead and nurture work teams.  The successful candidate must also demonstrate an entrepreneurial spirit and a strong desire to work with students, as well as other faculty and staff of the college. 
Application procedure:
Please submit a cover letter, resume, and the contact information for three professional references to Director of Agricultural Operations, Human Resources, P.O. Box 495037, Mount Berry, GA 30149-5037. 

Additional information:
Persons filling out an application for employment with Berry College may be required to submit to a full national background check. 
 

 
 

Coming Up in the Next Issue . . . 
Something old, something new . . . that might aptly describe the next issue of The Animal Science Monitor.  While we’ll be tackling another association in our “Connecting You” series, as well as presenting the next installment of “The ASM Community,” we might also have some brand-new content and material.  What is that content? Well, you’ll have to keep an eye on your email inbox to find out.  (Oh, and we don’t have anything borrowed or blue, for those of you who may be wondering.) 
The next issue of The ASM is scheduled for publication during the week of August 16
 
 

 

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Sep 082010
 
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The Animal Science Monitor
In This Issue

About This Issue


In Search Of


Is Your Company Preparing for the Future . . . or Trying to Stay Alive in the Present?


Connecting You: American Registry of Professional Animal Scientists


  In Focus: The Pet Food Institute


 Introducing The ASM ‘Video Link of the Month’


 Coming Up in the Next Issue 


Lookingfor a new career in the Animal ScienceIndustry?Please visit:
www.animalsciencejobs.comConnect with TheASM!LinkedIn
Twitter
Facebook

Visit us on the web! www.animalsciencemonitor.com

About This Issue . . .

In this issue of The Animal Science Monitor, we’re focusing specifically on the industry itself, in the form of our “Connecting You” series, as well as a special “In Focus” feature on the Pet Food Institute.  We’ll also ask you to take a look at your company and determine exactly where it stands right now in terms of the present . . . and the future.  Tough questions deserve tough answers, and that’s what we always strive to provide here at The ASM.  We hope you enjoy this issue, and once again, thank you for your loyal readership.

—Dan 
 
 

‘In Search of . . .’ 

Welcome to the next installment of our “In Search of . . .” series, in which we highlight Dan Simmons’s hottest job opening.  The same job might run in consecutive issues, but our goal is to give exposure to as many openings as possible throughout the year.  Below is the position that we’d like to highlight in this issue of The Animal Science Monitor, which is courtesy of South Dakota State University. 
 

MANAGER/LECTURER—DAIRY RESEARCH AND TRAINING FACILITY 

Location: South Dakota State University 

Specific duties associated with this position include the following: 

  • Coordination of research
  • Teaching classes and assisting with Dairy Club activities
  • Coaching the Dairy Cattle Judging team
  • Assisting with on-farm short courses
  • Hosting tours of the facility
  • Supervising dairy farm staff

 The person hired will represent the SDSU Dairy Research and Training Facility at producer meetings and extension functions.  An earned B.S. Degree in Dairy Production/Animal Science with two years of post-B.S. Degree experience in dairy farm management is required.  An M.S. Degree in Dairy Production or related field is preferred. Application deadline: Friday, October 15, or until filled 

For questions regarding the position, please contact Dr. Arnold Hippen at (605) 688-5490 or via email at arnold.hippen@sdstate.edu

To apply, visit the online employment site located at http://YourFuture.sdbor.edu

For questions regarding the electronic employment process, contact SDSU Human Resources at (605) 688-4128.  SDSU is an AA/EEO employer. 

If you’d like more information about how you can give your open positions exposure in The ASM, contact Dan Simmons at (888) 276-6789 or via email at dan@consearch.com

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Is Your Company Preparing for the Future . . . or Trying to Stay Alive in the Present?

(By Dan Simmons)

Early in my career, I was carpooling with Bill, who was further up the corporate ladder than I was.  One day as we were driving home, he said, “I gave your name to a headhunter today.  I went to see him because it’s time to get out of here.”  I was surprised.  Then he told me that his expense reimbursement checks, which normally took seven days, were taking two to three weeks and that this was a sign of cash flow troubles.

Bill went on to tell me that one of his previous employers went through cash flow problems about one year before they closed, which was about six months before he left.  He felt he was being prudent.  He was.  Within 45 days, both Bill and I had new employers, and within 18 months, the company started closing locations.  After another few years, the company was simply a memory.

Not every company that has cash flow issues closes.  You shouldn’t jump ship every time an employer faces bad times.  You should look to see if their plan for the future makes sense to you.  With Bill, our employer had recently opened a new location and bought a competitor.  It looked good from the outside at first glance, but they were investing in poor locations and buying inferior competitors with borrowed money.

Take a good look at your employer’s overall plan, resources, and mindset.  If the leadership is enthusiastic and confident, this is a good sign.  If raises are few, hiring is frozen and plans are varied, take a step back and see how your company compares with the competition.

Remember, you are responsible for your career, and if you can make timely moves like Bill did, you can keep from being laid off and find your next opportunity on your own terms.

If you have any questions about this article, feel free to contact me at dan@consearch.com.

Connect to Dan Simmons on LinkedIn. 
 
 
 

Connecting You: American Registry of Professional Animal Scientists

(By Matt Deutsch)

Welcome to the next installment of “Connecting You,” a new series of articles within The Animal Science Monitor newsletter. “Connecting You” will showcase a number of associations within the world of animal science and animal nutrition.

One such organization will be highlighted each month, usually in the second issue of that month. Our goal is to promote the organization, its website, its mission within the industry, and its upcoming events. We believe that giving exposure to these organizations will prove to be beneficial not only for them, but also for you—our readers.

This month’s organization

American Registry of Professional Animal Scientists (http://www.arpas.org/)

Its mission

The American Registry of Professional Animal Scientists (ARPAS) provides certification of animal scientists through examination, continuing education, and commitment to a code of ethics, and disseminates applied scientific information through publication of the peer-viewed journal The Professional Animal Scientist.

Membership information

ARPAS is affiliated with five professional societies:

  • American Dairy Science Association
  • American Meat Science Association
  • American Society of Animal Science
  • Equine Science Society
  • Poultry Science Association

 

In addition, the umbrella and service organization is the Federation of Animal Science Societies (FASS).

Upcoming events

ARPAS offers exams at a number of different conferences throughout the year.  If you’d like to take an ARPAS exam, send an email to arpas@assochq.org or to the person listed as the ARPAS representative at least a week prior to the conference.

Click here for a list of upcoming exam dates and sites.

Read future issues of The Animal Science Monitor for more information regarding organizations within the animal science and animal nutrition industries. 
 

In Focus: The Pet Food Institute

Next month, the Pet Food Institute and the National Grain and Feed Association will host the Feed and Pet Food Joint Industries Conference (JIC).  This conference will be held on Wednesday, September 22, through Friday, September 24, at the Marriott Downtown Magnificent Mile in Chicago.  For more information, visit www.jointindustriesconference.org.  In the meantime, The ASM will be profiling both organizations leading up to their joint conference.  First up is the Pet Food Institute. 
 

The Pet Food Institute (PFI) is the voice of U.S. pet food manufacturers.  PFI represents the companies that make 98 percent of all dog and cat food in the U.S. marketplace.  Since it was founded in 1958, PFI has served as the industry’s public education and media relations resource, representative before the U.S. Congress and state and federal agencies, organizer of seminars and educational programs, and liaison with other organizations.  PFI is dedicated to the following:

  • Promoting the overall care and well being of pets.
  • Supporting initiatives to advance the quality of dog and cat food.
  • Supporting research in pet nutrition and the important role of pets in our society.
  • Informing and educating the public on proper pet feeding and pet care.
  • Representing the pet food industry before federal and state governments.

Industry consensus builder

PFI works closely with the makers of dog and cat food to develop industry-wide consensus on key issues.  From discussing complex technical topics to crafting position statements on challenging public issues, PFI is the place where the U.S. pet food industry comes together to work on matters of mutual interest and concern.

Regulatory affairs

Through a positive working relationship with regulatory officials, PFI represents the pet food industry before international, federal, and state regulatory agencies, including the FDA, USDA, EPA and OSHA, as well as the Association of American Feed Control Officials (AAFCO).  PFI advocates for reasonable policies on important regulatory matters, such as product labeling and processing requirements.

State and local advocacy

PFI represents the pet food industry before state legislatures and municipalities on a wide range of issues affecting pet ownership and the manufacture of pet food.  PFI’s approach of building alliances with state and local organizations has resulted in an enormously successful track record.

Public affairs

Greater public awareness of the importance of nutrition to human health has led to increased attention to pet foods.  PFI is dedicated to promoting awareness of the nutritional soundness of commercially prepared pet foods.  PFI has also created a website for consumer information and answers to frequently asked questions about pet food, The Pet Food Report: A Consumer’s Guide to Pet Food (www.petfoodreport.com).

International trade policy work

PFI works with U.S. government officials to promote access to foreign markets and resolve trade barriers.  PFI maintains regular contact with the USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, USDA Foreign Agricultural Service, the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to ensure that the appropriate government officials are aware of issues as they may arise and to coordinate efforts for resolution.

For more information about the Pet Food Institute, visit http://www.petfoodinstitute.org.

Introducing The ASM ‘Video Link of the Month’Since we’re highlighting the Pet Food Institute in this issue of The Animal Science Monitor, it only makes sense that our “Video Link of the Month” involves pets.  Of course, as you know, our video link feature deals with animals or animal science, and we’re always looking to include links that are humorous in nature.  Well, this month’s link contains all of those elements.

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That’s right . . . this month’s link is a compilation of funny pet videos.  Believe it or not, we have never published such a video link in The ASM.  So as you might imagine, it’s long overdue.  You can view this month’s video link by clicking here.

Remember, we’re currently accepting submissions for this feature, which will run periodically throughout the year.  We like to highlight videos that pertain to a university or organizational production regarding research or development when those videos are submitted to us. You can send your video links to matt@animalsciencemonitor.com

 
 

Coming Up in the Next Issue . . .

Ah, preparation.  We’ve addressed that topic on many occasions within the pages of The Animal Science Monitor, and we’ll do so once again in our next issue.  After all, there are many different ways to prepare for something, and if done properly, they all lead to success.

The next issue of The ASM is scheduled for publication during the week of September 6.

 
Sep 202009
 

 

October 16: Animal Welfare Symposium “Building Partnerships
to Address Animal Welfare”,

 

Location: Nationwide and Ohio Farm Bureau 4-H Center, 2201
Fred Taylor Drive, Columbus, OH

 

Description: Participate in a balanced discussions about
farm animal welfare and learn about the surrounding scientific, ethical, social
and legal contexts.  The Animal Welfare Symposium is an opportunity for
you to: Gain a better understanding of animal welfare issues facing animal
agriculture, obtain the information and insight to make informed decisions,
hear a wide-range of perspectives from well-known animal welfare experts, learn
how legislation, self-regulation or auditing may impact animal production and
handling methods, find out about the scientific findings about the welfare of
animals in different housing systems, learn what other countries have done to
proactively address animal welfare issues and what we can learn from their
experiences.  The Animal Welfare Symposium offers an opportunity to learn
from well-known farm animal welfare experts and social scientists, who will
present talks on a wide range of animal welfare perspectives. 

 

www.vet.osu.edu/AnimalWelfareSymposium

Sep 122009
 

15th Great Lakes Dairy Sheep Symposium

November 12-14

at the Albany Marriott (www.albanymarriott.com). 

The
Great Lakes Dairy Sheep Symposium is the major annual event of the
dairy sheep industry in North America. For 15 years, this event has
attracted dairy sheep producers from Canada, Mexico and throughout the
United States. As a small but growing industry, the symposium provides
critical connections among producers. The first day includes talks
directed towards beginning producers. The second day features
presentations by innovative producers and top scientists from North
America and abroad to bring the latest information on dairy sheep
production and sheep milk processing to our domestic industry. The
final day will include tours of local dairy sheep producers and
processing plants that manufacture sheep milk cheeses. The Great Lakes
Dairy Sheep Symposium provides an educational environment and fosters
connections among dairy sheep producers, processor and researchers.

 

Some topics and speakers include:

-Getting Started in Sheep Dairying
-Cheesemaking with Sheep Milk (Dr. Stephanie Clark, Washington State Univ.)
-Challenges in Cheese Plant Design
-Intake on Pasture (Dr. Darrell Emmick, New York NRCS)
-Effects of Prepubertal Lamb Nutrition on Milk Production (Dr. Dave Thomas, Univ. Wisconsin-Madison)
-Genetic Markers for Milk Production (Dr. Raluca Mateescu, Oklahoma State Univ.)
-Sheep Nutrition and Fermentable Fiber (Dr. Mike Thonney, Cornell University)

Sep 082009
 

NIAA Logo

 

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                                                   Contact: Teres Lambert

September 1, 2009                                                                                          847-838-2966

tlambert@animalagriculture.org

 

 


ID
INFO EXPO 2009: Presentations Available Online

 

COLORADO SPRINGS, CO—Diverse opinions and facts were voiced, shared and questioned at IDINFO EXPO 2009, Aug. 25-27, Kansas City, Mo., when 27 speakers representing federal and state government, agribusinesses, media, industry—large producers as well as small producers—and the food industry conveyed their messages related to the current state of animal identification in the United States, obstacles, opportunities and next steps. Sponsored by the National Institute for Animal Agriculture, the EXPO included several interactive discussion sessions which allowed EXPO participants to get their to-the-point questions answered in front of the assembly while breaks provided opportunity for one-on-one conversations between speakers and attendees.

 

“No one was here to endorse or negate NAIS (the National Animal Identification System),” stated Glenn Fischer, chairman of the IDINFO EXPO Planning Committee. “We gathered to listen, learn, clarify concerns and opportunities, identify next steps and collaborate on furthering animal identification in the U.S.”

 

“In the end, consensus was that a top-down approach to national animal identification isn’t the answer and neither is a bottom-up approach. A vast majority agreed that the best approach is somewhere in the middle with producer understanding of the program and dedicated leadership needed to make a program work.”

 

Dr. William Hartmann, executive director and state veterinarian, Minnesota Board of Animal Health, summarized his state animal health experiences and views quite succinctly: “A national animal identification plan is not a question of mandatory or voluntary. It’s a necessity. ”

 

Whether animal agriculture likes it or not, “necessity” it could become as Dr. David Acheson, formerly of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration who now serves as managing director of food and import safety practice at Leavitt Partners in Utah, pointed out that the Obama Administration “wants to make capital out of protecting the food supply.”  Acheson noted that food safety efforts by the FDA under Obama will be stepped up, adding that a food traceability requirement is likely.

 

Issues related to confidentiality, liability and cost—obstacles often cited by producers—were addressed by Elizabeth Springsteen, staff attorney with the National Agricultural Law Center; Dr. Kevin Dhuyvetter, professor, agricultural economics, Kansas State University; and Dr. John Evans, SWV Consulting Inc. Avoiding convoluted legalese, Springsteen delivered the facts regarding the Freedom of Information Act, court subpoena power, exceptions to USC ξ8791—which is part of the 2008 Farm Bill—and three ways liability can be imposed. Drs. Dhuyvetter and Evans showed the dollars and cents side of the equation.

 

“As we hoped, presenters were open and transparent, presenting facts and opinions,” stated Victor Velez, vice chair of the IDINFO EXPO Planning Committee. “I urge those who were unable to attend IDINFO EXPO 2009 to go online and access the many PowerPoint and audio-video presentations that are available. It would be advantageous to each and every person involved in animal agriculture to watch and listen to each and every speaker.”

 

One person departing IDINFO EXPO summarized the animal identification conference in this manner: “It stimulated a dimension of my thinking. I’m definitely thinking the solution should be industry-driven. Mandatory? Voluntary? State led with national oversight or a federal program? I need to think those over a bit more. At least I’m now armed with more information so I can make educated decisions.”

 

Presentations from IDINFO EXPO 2009 are available at www.animalagriculture.org.

 

The National Institute for Animal Agriculture provides a forum for building consensus and advancing proactive solutions for animal agriculture—the beef, dairy, swine, sheep, goat, equine and poultry industries—and provides continuing education and communication linkages for animal agriculture professionals. NIAA is dedicated to programs that work towards the eradication of disease that pose risk to the health of animals, wildlife and humans; promote a safe and wholesome from supply for our nation and abroad; and promote best practices in environmental stewardship, animal health and well-being. NIAA members represent all facets of animal agriculture.

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