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Jul 192011
 

(By Don Hunter)

Perhaps at no other time in this nation’s history has the issue of work-life balance been so prominent.  That’s because many employees are being asked to do more in less time by their employers.

Unfortunately, it’s easy to get caught up in the “rat race” and find yourself working longer and more often than you should (especially if you believe that it’s expected of you).  But you can only go on like that for so long until something gives.  Before you reach that point, consider the following steps:

  1. Analyze the situation—How much time do you spend at work?  How much work do you take home?  How much time do you spend with your family and friends and engaging in non-work related activities?
  2. Keep a log—Answering the questions above might be easier if you actually track the time that you spend during the day.  The results could be eye-opening.
  3. Ask friends and family for input—These are the people who are affected the most by your work-life balance (or your lack of it).  Gaining their insight could be extremely beneficial.
  4. Prioritize—Now that you’ve analyzed your situation, what things are most important to you?  The answer to this question will help you to better prioritize your time and your activities.
  5. Re-assess your career—If your work-life balance is out of whack, could a change of employment help?  Sure, the job market isn’t the greatest at the moment, but there are opportunities available.  Finding one and making a switch might make a tremendous difference.
  6. Create a plan and then implement it—This is the final step.  A plan is only as good as how well you implement it, so don’t just think and talk about creating more balance in your life—do it!

Remember, your work-life balance will never be perfect, at least not all the time.  However, it’s important to keep striving toward that balance every day, one bit at a time.  Employees who are able to do that discover their job—and invariably all other aspects of their life—are more enjoyable.

So . . . how’s your work-life balance?

If you have any questions, send an email to don@animalsciencemonitor.com.

Connect with Don on LinkedIn.

 

 


Jun 222011
 


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(By Dan Simmons)

One of the privileges of being a recruiter is that I get to work closely with a variety of executives and learn what they look for in the people they desire to hire.

Recently, I began to reflect on these leaders and what they look for in people, and I realized that I’ve observed the hierarchy of leadership. Since I write this column each and every month for The Animal Science Monitor, I thought I would share my observations with you here. For this purpose, I enlisted the help of dictionary.com in defining four key terms.

Executive: A person having administrative or supervisory authority in an organization.

Manager: A person responsible for controlling or administering all or part of a company or organization.

Leader: The person who leads or commands a group, organization, or country. A person followed by others.

Mentor: An experienced and trusted adviser. An experienced person in a company, college, or school who trains and counsels new employees or students.

The most evolved executives I encounter are those who have what I call executive style. These individuals have evolved from manager to leader to leader/mentor. They control all or part of a company by counseling employees to become leaders themselves and by behaving in a manner that makes people passionately desire to follow the direction they’re headed and to achieve the organization’s goals.

These leaders do not talk in terms of dollars or units. They speak about values, passion, customers and balance. Of course, they manage their business units by the numbers, but they don’t manage people solely on numbers. Instead, they lead them by ingraining the company’s vision into their team’s work and empowering individuals to make decisions in the company’s best interest. These same leaders make certain that team members balance life and work so they will stay happy and self-fulfilled over the long haul.

I encourage each of the executives who read my column to reflect upon their own executive style and ask if they would like to work under a leader just like them.

If you have any questions about this article, please contact me at dan@consearch.com.

One of the privileges of being a recruiter is that I get to work closely with a variety of executives and learn what they look for in the people they desire to hire.

 

Recently, I began to reflect on these leaders and what they look for in people, and I realized that I’ve observed the hierarchy of leadership. Since I write this column each and every month for The Animal Science Monitor, I thought I would share my observations with you here. For this purpose, I enlisted the help of dictionary.com in defining four key terms.

 

Executive: A person having administrative or supervisory authority in an organization.

 

Manager: A person responsible for controlling or administering all or part of a company or organization.

 

Leader: The person who leads or commands a group, organization, or country. A person followed by others.

 

Mentor: An experienced and trusted adviser. An experienced person in a company, college, or school who trains and counsels new employees or students.

 

The most evolved executives I encounter are those who have what I call executive style. These individuals have evolved from manager to leader to leader/mentor. They control all or part of a company by counseling employees to become leaders themselves and by behaving in a manner that makes people passionately desire to follow the direction they’re headed and to achieve the organization’s goals.

 

These leaders do not talk in terms of dollars or units. They speak about values, passion, customers and balance. Of course, they manage their business units by the numbers, but they don’t manage people solely on numbers. Instead, they lead them by ingraining the company’s vision into their team’s work and empowering individuals to make decisions in the company’s best interest. These same leaders make certain that team members balance life and work so they will stay happy and self-fulfilled over the long haul.

 

I encourage each of the executives who read my column to reflect upon their own executive style and ask if they would like to work under a leader just like them.

 

If you have any questions about this article, please contact me at dan@consearch.com

One of the privileges of being a recruiter is that I get to work closely with a variety of executives and learn what they look for in the people they desire to hire.

Recently, I began to reflect on these leaders and what they look for in people, and I realized that I’ve observed the hierarchy of leadership.  Since I write this column each and every month for The Animal Science Monitor, I thought I would share my observations with you here.  For this purpose, I enlisted the help of dictionary.com in defining four key terms.

Executive: A person having administrative or supervisory authority in an organization.

Manager: A person responsible for controlling or administering all or part of a company or organization.

Leader: The person who leads or commands a group, organization, or country.  A person followed by others.

Mentor: An experienced and trusted adviser.  An experienced person in a company, college, or school who trains and counsels new employees or students.

The most evolved executives I encounter are those who have what I call executive style.  These individuals have evolved from manager to leader to leader/mentor.  They control all or part of a company by counseling employees to become leaders themselves and by behaving in a manner that makes people passionately desire to follow the direction they’re headed and to achieve the organization’s goals.

These leaders do not talk in terms of dollars or units.  They speak about values, passion, customers and balance.  Of course, they manage their business units by the numbers, but they don’t manage people solely on numbers.  Instead, they lead them by ingraining the company’s vision into their team’s work and empowering individuals to make decisions in the company’s best interest.  These same leaders make certain that team members balance life and work so they will stay happy and self-fulfilled over the long haul.

I encourage each of the executives who read my column to reflect upon their own executive style and ask if they would like to work under a leader just like them.

If you have any questions about this article, please contact me at dan@consearch.com.

 

.

 

Jun 222011
 

Dan Simmons of Continental Search & Outplacement, Inc., one of the founders of The Animal Science Monitor newsletter, received an award recently for his production in a national recruiting organization.  That organization is Top Echelon Network, an elite network of highly specialized search firms.

Dan won the “Placer of the Year Award” for 2010, the fourth time since 2002 that he’s won that award as a Preferred Member of Top Echelon Network.  He’s also won numerous other awards from the Network since he became a Preferred Member in 1996.

Top Echelon Network President Mark Demaree praised Dan, not only for his production in the Network in 2010, but also for his commitment as a Preferred Member during his entire tenure in Top Echelon.

“Dan has been a model of productivity since he joined our Network,” said Demaree.  “He’s embraced The Four Pillars of the Network—Quality, Communication, Trust, and Active Participation—and just as importantly, he’s embraced the spirit of networking.  We’re pleased to once again be able to honor Dan for his accomplishments, his professionalism, and his contributions to our Network.  We look forward to recognizing his achievements again in the future.”

Top Echelon Network passed out its annual awards at its recent National Convention, which was held last month at The Westin Beach Resort in Fort Lauderdale, Fla.

Since 1988, Top Echelon Network has brought recruiters together for the purpose of sharing information so they can better serve their client companies.  Top Echelon Network is comprised of nearly 400 recruiting firms and over 1,000 recruiters in every major industry from all across the country.

Jun 222011
 

(By Dan Simmons)

Balance.  There seems to be a considerable amount of talk about balance these days.  Both California and the federal budget seem to be uninfluenced by the word.  Companies are now looking at resumes to see if a person lists yoga as a hobby, as this promotes balance in one’s life.  Even Madison Avenue is cashing in on our need for balance.

I admit that I struggle to keep balance in my life.  I suspect I am not the only one.  This current trend in today’s job market is so important that I enlisted my entire team to help write this issue’s feature article.  I hope you enjoy this tongue-in-cheek blog about the workaholic’s vacation.

“The Workaholic’s Summer Vacation” by Dudley du Moore

Once upon a time, I was happy toiling away at work.  From early morning until late in the evening I was engulfed, working.  Then my wife, Patience, began to complain at a whole new level about how much I was at the office and how stressed I was.

Luckily, my boss also suspected that I was headed toward a “burnout” and put me on mandatory vacation that Friday afternoon.  I didn’t bother to tell Patience that I was on mandatory vacation; I simply came home and told her that I had been listening to her and that she should get the kids ready because next week we were going to take them to Disney World.  And so the mandatory “vacation schedule” commenced.

Saturday—Mandatory Vacation Day #1

4:42 a.m.—Put finishing touches on proposal for new client, just as the kids dragged me to the car to drive to the airport.

9:00 a.m. —Touched down in Orlando.  The weather was beautiful, and Patience got us onboard the Disney bus.  This was a perfect place to sit, pull out my laptop, and finish that proposal.

9:45 a.m. —Off the bus and checking in at the hotel.  The room has free WiFi.  I can check email from here.  First email is from the Director of Human Resources reminding me that I am not supposed to be checking work email this week.  Clever.  Wish I hadn’t confirmed receipt.

12:00 p.m. —Lunch by the pool with the kids.  I think I will get in the pool after I review the budget for the next big project at work.  Patience seems a little worried that I brought the laptop to the pool.  I told her not to worry, that I had purchased a splash-resistant cover.  She is so thoughtful.

3:00 p.m. —Disappointed that the kids didn’t have much energy left when I got in the pool.  No worries, they can take a nap while I check my Facebook status and let the people at work know what I’m up to this week.

7:00 p.m. —Patience and the kids head down to the lobby to wait for the car so we can head to dinner.  I’ve got at least 10 minutes until they grab the car, giving me plenty of time to make sure no emergency issues came up at work.

7:45 p.m. —Dinner was great.  Leg of lamb and garlic mashed potatoes!  Patience was a bit embarrassed that my iPhone kept ringing in the middle of our meal at the restaurant.  Oh, well . . . people understand it’s business.

9:00 p.m. —Kids head to bed and we put on a movie.  A little email check before the lights are out should make my day a very successful mandatory vacation!

May 262011
 

(By Dan Simmons)

Just a few weeks ago (April 7) The Conference Board Measure of CEO Confidence™ showed that CEO confidence is again on the rise.  The Measure now reads 67, up from 62 during the first quarter of the year.  As for the employment outlook, CEOs are more bullish than last year, with half now saying they intend to ramp up their hiring.

The report goes on to say that half of all CEOs anticipate an increase in employment levels in their industry, up significantly from 30% a year ago.  The proportion of CEOs who anticipate a decrease in hiring declined to 16 percent from 22% a year ago.

The amount of search work at our firm confirms this improved job market.  If this is the current situation, then wise professionals will take this opportunity to examine their current employment situation since opportunities are more plentiful. After all, it’s wise to “make hay while the sun shines” and land a better position while companies are hiring.

This self-examination is called a career objective statement.  A template and example for this is provided below.  To arrive at this objective, I suggest answering the following questions:

  • Are you really happy doing the functions in your current job?  What functions do you wish to perform during the week so that you will have earned the paycheck you desire at the end of the week?  Are these functions the core of your current job?
  • Where do you want to live/need to live?
  • What are the one or two most likely job titles that would suit the position to which you aspire?
  • What do you expect to earn this year in your current job and are you content with it?  What would you expect to earn in this next role?
  • What professional, educational, and life experience do you have that shows that you’re qualified to take the next step in your career advancement?
  • In what type of organization (size, culture, status, etc.) would you fit in best?  Are you with such a company now?
  • What accomplishments can you provide that demonstrate a track record of success in your focus area?
  • If this ideal situation came your way, are you prepared to resign your present position and accept the new role in the next 30 days?  If not, when?  Why not?
  • Is this the right time for you to make a job change?  What is motivating you to make a change?

 

Example of a career objective statement:

“To position my career in the way I desire, I would be a ____ or a ____ for a ________ (type of organization).  I want to reside in _______.  I expect to earn between $_____ and ___________ because I have been doing __________ for the last X years and I have a ________ degree.  Additionally, my success with ______ will more than justify this income.  I’m prepared to make this change in the next ______ months.  The right time for me to make this change is ____________ because ____________.”

Once you’ve created this statement, you have clarity in your career objectives and can begin to network with others to achieve this role and boost your career.  If you’d like to start your networking, contact me at dan@consearch.com.  I’d love to hear your career objective.

May 182011
 

Welcome to the next installment in our “Career Book of the Month” feature!  As many of you already know, every month we’ll be reviewing a book designed to help advance your career. 

Now at first glance, it might seem as though the book we’re reviewing this month has to do more with companies than with employees looking to advance the scope of their career . . . but its principles are just as applicable, as you’ll see. 

This month’s book in the spotlight is Inbound Marketing: Get Found Using Google, Social Media, and Blogs by Brian Halligan and Dharmesh Shah (2009, 256 pages). 

Below is Dan Simmons’s review of this month’s selection: 

“In today’s economy, everybody has choices about almost everything . . . and they have the ability to act upon those choices.  That’s why this book is applicable in a number of different ways.  Employees can apply the principles in this book to improve the results of their company’s marketing and branding efforts and also use them to tweak their current strategy regarding career advancement.  Whatever your goals are for your company or your career, Inbound Marketing is worth your time.” 

Click here to read more about Inbound Marketing on the Amazon.com website. 

If you have a career book that you’ve read and you’d like to endorse, we’d be happy to publish your endorsement.  Send your information to matt@animalsciencemonitor.com, and you might be included in a future issue of the newsletter!

May 182011
 

When it comes to a job interview, it’s not only important what you say, but also how you say it.  That’s one of the themes behind this month’s ‘ASM Video Link Spotlight,’ which happens to be a rather humorous commercial for Ally Bank.  With the next issue of the newsletter being the Jobs Issue, we thought it was rather appropriate.  The job market is competitive enough these days . . . there’s no use complicating matters by being misunderstood.  No matter how funny it is. 

Click here to watch this month’s video link in “The ASM Spotlight.” 

And if you have a video link that you would like to see published in The Animal Science Monitor, be sure to email it to matt@animalsciencemonitor.com. 
 

Video Link:

May 182011
 

 

If you’re looking to become certified to write plans for beef operations, then you should attend the Beef Feed Management Certification Workshop on Tuesday, June 21. 

This workshop will allow any PA-NRCS Qualified Feed Management Plan Writer to get certified to write Feed Management Plans for beef operations. In addition, anyone who has passed the ARPAS feed management exam and is considering working with beef operations should attend. 

This program is open to beef producers and agricultural professionals who are interested in the feed management program.  The Beef ARPAS exam will be also be given during the workshop for those attendees who would like to take it. 

The workshop will be held from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the following location: 

Masonic Village Farm

1 Masonic Drive

Elizabethtown, PA  17022 

Once you reach the farm, follow the signs to the visitors’ center.  The meeting room is right off the visitor center entrance. 

For more information regarding the Beef Feed Management Certification Workshop, click here.  Those who are interested in attending should register before Tuesday, June 14.

May 182011
 

At The Animal Science Monitor, we’re all about training—engaging in it, announcing it, and promoting it.  And that’s why we’d like to let all of our loyal readers know about the first PORK 505 short course, a joint venture between the American Meat Science Association (AMSA), the National Pork Board (NPB), and the U.S. Meat Export Federation (USMEF).  This event will be held on Monday, June 6, and Tuesday, June 7, at the University of Nebraska. 

What is PORK 505?  It’s a day-and-a-half program designed to update participants on quality standards, culinary techniques, international marketing, and other important issues facing the pork industry worldwide.  Topics that will be covered at PORK 505 include the following: 

  • Hands-on international carcass fabrication methods
  • Pork palatability and quality standards
  • Hands-on culinary demonstration and preparation of international recipes using fabricated cuts
  • Niche/specialty products that appeal to the worldwide marketplace
  • Currently exported offal products and their importance in the worldwide marketplace
  • Hot topics in the international pork industry

 

That’s just part of the good news.  PORK 505 begins at 10 a.m. on Monday, June 6, and will end at noon the following day.  That means attendees will have plenty of time to make the three-hour drive to Des Moines, Iowa, for the World Pork Expo.  It’s like having the best of both (pork) worlds! 

And the good news doesn’t end there, either.  The AMSA is offering discounted registration fees to companies or organizations sending more than one person to any AMSA short course.  After the first person pays the full registration fee, the second person receives a 10% discount.  All additional registrants will receive a 25% discount.  Attendees must attend the class at the same location to qualify for the discount. 

Click here for a complete course outline and to register for the event.  For more information or questions regarding PORK 505, contact Deidrea Mabry at 1-800-517-AMSA, Ext. 12 or via email at dmabry@meatscience.org. 

If you’d like your event to gain exposure in The ASM, send an email to matt@animalsciencemonitor.com.

Apr 082011
 

Everybody wants to find the job that’s perfect for them . . . and you just might find that job in The Animal Science Monitor!  That’s because we promote Dan Simmons’s hottest job opening in every single issue of the newsletter.  In this issue, that hot job is a Dairy Nutrition Account Manager position in Tulare, Ca.  If you’d like more information about how you can give your open positions exposure in The ASM, contact Dan at (888) 276-6789 or via email at dan@consearch.com.

Click here for details about this issue’s hottest job opening!